thetigerbeat:

British woman Harnaam Kaur started growing facial hair at 16 as a side effect of polycystic ovary syndrome. She tried waxing, shaving and bleaching before being baptised a Sikh, which forbids the cutting of body hair. Photograph: Brock Elbank/Barcroft Media

thetigerbeat:

British woman Harnaam Kaur started growing facial hair at 16 as a side effect of polycystic ovary syndrome. She tried waxing, shaving and bleaching before being baptised a Sikh, which forbids the cutting of body hair. Photograph: Brock Elbank/Barcroft Media

unexplained-events:

A politician(Reynaldo Dagsa) takes a picture of some of his family and captures his assassin in the same shot.
This happened on New Years Eve(2011) and the fireworks were so loud that people actually didnt hear the shots being fired. The politician was shot in the arm and then the chest. He was pronounced DOA at nearby hospital.

unexplained-events:

A politician(Reynaldo Dagsa) takes a picture of some of his family and captures his assassin in the same shot.

This happened on New Years Eve(2011) and the fireworks were so loud that people actually didnt hear the shots being fired. The politician was shot in the arm and then the chest. He was pronounced DOA at nearby hospital.

malformalady:

'Blood prints' following scarification by Keith Alexander. “After the last line was cut, he made two “bloodprints” by pressing paper towels to the cutting; one for me to take home and one for him to keep. Keith often made prints for his portfolio; each of us still with him in spirit (and blood) long after the cutting healed. He considered it much more personal than a photograph; a living connection to the people who wore his art.”

malformalady:

'Blood prints' following scarification by Keith Alexander. “After the last line was cut, he made two “bloodprints” by pressing paper towels to the cutting; one for me to take home and one for him to keep. Keith often made prints for his portfolio; each of us still with him in spirit (and blood) long after the cutting healed. He considered it much more personal than a photograph; a living connection to the people who wore his art.”